What We Can Learn From The Olympics For Our Life

I am not sure about you but I absolutely love the Olympics.

I had the opportunity to train a few former Olympic Athletes and here are some things I learned from them and from watching the Olympics.

1) The Law of Action

When it comes to results in life a person can learn all they want and never achieve anything.

You can want, wish, and hope but without action nothing will happen.

For example, Michael Phelps said he did not train to his potential.  He might not be able to achieve his goals because he did not work as hard as he could.  The truth of the matter is genetics is really over rated.  I have never seen a baby do a black flip, jump, lift or do any of that stuff when they are born.  I have asked my daughter (on the left) to do flips it does not work:)

So what we learn is that it takes action, to achieve anything worthwhile!

2.  The Law of Faith/Belief

Nobody goes into wanting to lose or thinking they have no chance of winning.

The first step that helps people take action is belief.

They shoot for the gold, work for the gold but first they believe they can get to the olympics and even win the gold.

This happens with fitness goals all the time.

A person does not truly believe they can reach a goal so they never really work at it.

We can learn that we must first believe before we can ever achieve anything!

3.  The Law of Specific Training

When it comes to any training for a goal a person must be very detailed and specific.

A triathelete and a gymnast will and should train very different.

The details are super important and the abilities are very different.

A gymnast is not going to win in a triathlon and the reverse is also true.

So the first step is figuring out a goal then training specifically for it.

4.  The Law of  Discipline  

There are times that Olympians do not want to train but they train anyways.

They have to sacrifice so many things to become great.

They have to be disciplined in work ethic, nutrition,  training times, and routine.

We learn that discipline is the crucial ingredient to reaching any goal.

5.  The Law of Constant Improvement

My wife and I were discussing what do olympic gold medalists do after they win or after they break a new record.

She says they try to beat their last record.

I totally agree that they are never truly satisfied with their results they are always trying to get better and that is what makes them unique.

They always want to improve from where they are to where they want to go.

What we learn is that somebody who improves gradually and constantly will always beat the person who becomes complacent and content with their results.

 6.  The Law of Individual Team Work

The saying “a team is only as weak as its weakest link” is always true.

For a team to be better an individual has to get better.

Individuals should get better for themselves and for the team.

I will never forget my college basketball days when I sat on the bench.

Sitting on the bench is something I was not very good at so I worked as hard as I could.

Years later talking to a former teammate he said that it was us that made them better… that pushed them to become better.  It is nice to have an individual goal yet have the team support to become better than you could on your own.

What we learn is that we can help more people including ourselves when we become our absolute best!

7.  The Law of Failure

I am a perfectionist in many areas and that can be very bad because it can stop me from trying.

The rule is if you are not failing at something you are not trying…. I totally agree.

When it comes to the Olympics so many of these athletes started very young.

Tears of failure from falling, missing that jump, making mistakes are the only way to get to the success of getting to the Olympics.

Jerry Barca: “There is a gap between people that are really good and people who are extraordinary. One of the things that seem to always stand out is that people at the extraordinary level have a different relationship with failure, mainly they’re not phased or stopped by it.”

Dan Jansen: “That’s one of the reasons I ended up winning in the end. It is because I was never afraid to fail. The worst thing, and I always hear — quote —successful people say it is “Oh, my fear of failure is what drives me.” I don’t believe that. You may not like to get beat. But if you’re successful, you’re not afraid to fail because you can’t be. You’ve got to be innovative sometimes. You’ve got to take risks sometimes. People who are truly successful — they may say they’re afraid to fail, but more so it’s a dislike of failure.” http://plimptonmovie.com/updates/dan-jansen-success-failure-and-olympic-gold

 What we learn is to learn from failure, get better, and keep going no matter what.  

 

All this can be used to develop a any training goal.

 

You probably are not training for the Olympics but no matter your goal these points might help

What are your thoughts? Comment Below!

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are three things Jeremy is more passionate about than anything:

1. Seeing people, like you, transform their lives through new, healthier habits and routines.
2. Seeing businesses within the Fitness and Wellness industry growing and thriving, despite potentially adverse conditions of the market.
3. His Christian faith, which drives him to increase his talents to help as many others as he can.

Jeremy works tirelessly to educate, empower and envision his clients, helping them create everything God made them to be.

His motto is to grow in faith, create freedom, and progress in fitness excellence.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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